Brain Injury, Stroke & Cerebral Palsy

 

 

TBI, CP & Stroke are neurological disorders involving movement due to brain development abnormalities. CP can affect other functions depending on the parts of the brain affected. Symptoms appear in infancy or early in childhood, permanently affecting muscle coordination and movement. The brain damage caused by cerebral palsy can also contribute to problems with speech, hearing, vision, and can be responsible for learning disabilities. Although there is no cure for cerebral palsy, various treatments can help improve quality of life for patients. Neurofeedback can be used to improve and correct brain function, thereby reducing the symptoms of CP.

Watch the stages of improvements.

Neurofeedback can reduce occurrences of spasticity and chorionic movement, and can also correct or improve:

  • Muscle control
  • Attention and focus
  • Posture
  • Articulation
  • Executive functions
  • Processing speed
  • Mental and behavioral flexibility
  • Physical coordination
  • Amblyopia, eye turn, and/or lazy eye
  • IQ

BRAIN INJURY, STROKE,

CEREBRAL PALSY

Brain Injury, Stroke, Cerebral Palsy – Neurofeedback Publications

 

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